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Posted By FFL Dealer Network on 08/20/2019 in Firearm News

Video Games Are Not to Blame?



Video Games Are Not to Blame?

Video Games Are Not to Blame?        

Do violent video games increase the likelihood of someone being violent?

This question is common after the shootings that happen in the United States. A brief check of social media and the news says there is no link between violent video games and violent behavior in real life. But how accurate are these reports? Does video game violence transfer into the real world?

The Associated Press even says there is no link. "Do video games trigger violent behavior? Scientific studies have found no link. But the persistent theory is back in the headlines following the mass shooting in El Paso on Saturday."

The video game industry, as expected, is absolutely opposed to the idea as well. Strong denials about a link between shootings and video game violence are issued from every game maker that turns out violent video games.

Adam Sessler, former G4 network host and co-founder of gaming analytics company Spiketrap told Spectrum Local News for San Antonio," he believed the conversation made more sense in the days of Columbine, when violent video games were relatively new to the mainstream. Now that years of research is available to debunk the link between violent games and crime, Sessler has faith people won't buy into that narrative."

Science says otherwise.





"The one consistent finding is that the majority of the studies on very young children—as opposed to those in their teens upwards—tend to show that children do become more aggressive after either playing or watching a violent video game," says a report in ScienceDirect. That is a 2017 report.

In 2015, another study concluded much the same thing. "The evidence strongly suggests that exposure to violent video games is a causal risk factor for increased aggressive behavior, aggressive cognition, and aggressive affect and for decreased empathy and prosocial behavior," says the report Violent video game effects on aggression, empathy, and prosocial behavior in Eastern and Western countries: A meta-analytic review in the American Psychological Association journal.

Another report from Oxford's journal Human Communication Research says there is a link between violent video games and real world violence. However, the link between violence on TV, in news programs and shows, is even stronger. "Results suggest there is a smaller effect of violent video games on aggression than has been found with television violence on aggression," writes John L. Sherry.

The question then becomes, is there a real link? A search on Google Scholar turns up plenty of published research papers saying there is a link.  What do you think?  

What do you think about this post? Leave a comment below!

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